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THE
TEAM

KEY PARTNERS

Building the scheme

Building the scheme

Updates on phasing plan/works programme, and other key updates will be available here.


Phasing Plan/Works Programme

Baker Street Two Way Phasing (version June 2017)


Immediately Impacted Junctions

1. Gloucester Place - Blandford Street had an unsafe basement and you may have noticed that works have been halted at this junction. Traffic Management has been removed from site and FM Conway is re-programming this junction now that the basement has been made safe by its owner.


2. Gloucester Place - Bickenhall Street (one lane out of three on Gloucester Place will be closed);

  • From 24 July for approx. 4 weeks: Closure of Salisbury Place at the junction of Thornton Place. Diversion through Thornton Place, York Street – Gloucester Place; Salisbury Place will operate two-way between Gloucester Place and Thornton Place to maintain local access. Works completed (18th August).
  • From 24 July for approx. 8 weeks: Some parking bays will be temporarily suspended on the south side of the Bickenhall Street junction with Gloucester Place, so that site equipment and facilities can be stored.
  • From early September for approx. 2 weeks: some parking bays will be temporarily suspended on the north side of Bickenhall Street.

3. Gloucester Place - Ivor Place (one lane out of three on Gloucester Place will be closed);

  • From 24 July for approx. 6 weeks – Ivor place will be closed eastbound from Linhope Street to Gloucester Place (diversion through Linhope Street, Huntsworth Mews, Gloucester Place). A loading bay will also be suspended on Gloucester Place, south of Ivor Place (outside 171-173).
  • From 24 July to mid October: some parking bays will be temporarily suspended so that site equipment and facilities can be stored (outside 179 Ivor Place).
  • From early September for approx. 3 weeks – the loading bay on Gloucester Place outside no.s 162-166 will be temporarily suspended. Parking bays will be suspended on Ivor Place (north side outside Francis Holland School).
  • From late September for approx. 3 weeks – parking bays will be temporarily suspended on Gloucester Place (outside no.s 172-182) and on Ivor Place (north side outside Francis Holland School).

4. Melcombe Place, Great Central Street, Boston Place.

  • From 31 July – late August, Great Central Street will be closed to northbound traffic; the diversion for northbound traffic will be clearly signed via Marylebone Road, Gloucester Place and Dorset Square. Some parking bays will be temporarily suspended on Great Central Street.
  • From late August – early October, Boston Place will be closed to all traffic at the junction of Melcombe Place; the diversion will be fully signed via Ivor Place, Balcombe Street, Dorset Square and Melcombe Place. There will also be advanced warning signage.
  • From 31 July – early October: some parking bays on the eastern side of Great Central Street will be suspended so that site equipment and facilities can be stored.

5. Gloucester Place – George Street (one lane out of three on Gloucester Place northbound will be closed);

  • From 7th August to mid-September: some parking bays will be temporarily suspended in Gloucester Place.
  • From mid-September to mid-October: some parking bays will be temporarily suspended in George Street (outside number 104).
  • From 7th August – mid-October: some parking bays will be temporarily suspended in George Street on the southern side so that site equipment and facilities can be stored.

6. Gloucester Place – Dorset Close (one lane out of three on Gloucester Place northbound will be closed);

  • From 7th August to mid-September: the single yellow-line facility on the southern side of Dorset Close will need to be occupied by site equipment and facilities.
  • From 4th September – end September: some parking bays will be temporarily suspended outside 153 Gloucester Place north of Huntsworth Mews to make way for re-located bus stops.
  • From 4th September for two weeks: Temporary relocation of bus stop ‘S’ to current bus stop ‘T’ outside 147 Gloucester Place. Bus stop ‘T’ will be relocated to the parking bays suspended north of Huntsworth Mews (outside 153 Gloucester Place).
  • From 18th September for one week: Temporary relocation of coach stop 19 outside 137 Gloucester Place to current bus stop ‘T’ outside 147 Gloucester Place. Bus stop ‘T’ will be relocated to the parking bays suspended north of Huntsworth Mews (outside 153 Gloucester Place).
  • From 4th September to mid-September: DORSET CLOSE RESTRICTED ACCESS – details regarding access for residents and servicing has been agreed with residents.

7. Ivor Place – Chagford Street (Ivor Place narrowed): PLEASE NOTE Thames Water have informed us that Ivor Place will be closed at the junction of Park Road until mid-October;

  • From early August for approx. two weeks: CHAGFORD STREET RESTRICTED ACCESS
  • From early August for approx. two weeks: Suspension of resident parking on the northern footway of Ivor Place.
  • From early August for approx. two weeks: all resident parking bays will be temporarily suspended on the southern side of Ivor Place outside St Cyprian’s Church.

8. Gloucester Place – Portman Close (one lane out of three on Gloucester Place northbound will be closed);

  • From 4th September to end-October there will be a one-lane closure on Gloucester Place northbound (western side) plus the temporary suspension of bus stop George Street (K).
  • Gloucester Place/Portman Close and access into and out of NCP car park to be reduced to one lane off-peak.

Construction Drawings

70004404-03-OA-GA-01.pdf

70004404-03-OA-GA-02.pdf

70004404-03-OA-GA-03.pdf


Parking and loading arrangements

70004404-C-OA-TMO-EX-01.pdf

70004404-C-OA-TMO-EX-02.pdf

70004404-C-OA-TMO-EX-03.pdf

About the project

About the project

Improved streets for the local community.

Welcome to the Baker Street Two Way Project website. The project aims to transform Baker Street and Gloucester Place into pleasant streets where people can get about easily and safely, relax and spend time.

The aim of the project is to reduce the dominance of traffic along Baker Street and Gloucester Place which divides up the area, creating access and safety problems.

The evidence shows that one way traffic down Baker Street and up Gloucester Place, which often resemble urban motorways, is at the heart of these problems. The wide carriageways encourage high traffic speeds, particularly during quieter periods of the day. When traffic volumes are highest during the peak periods, there is congestion southbound on Baker Street approaching Marylebone Road and Oxford Street and northbound on Gloucester Place approaching Marylebone Road.

By reintroducing two way traffic flow along Baker Street and Gloucester Place and complementary improvements to the public realm in the area, the project will make the whole area more pedestrian friendly and accessible and restore the unique Marylebone character.

The Baker Street Two Way project is being delivered by Westminster City Council and Transport for London. The project is also supported by the Baker Street Quarter Partnership and The Portman Estate.

This is an opportunity to rebalance road space and traffic signal time to provide greater benefit to pedestrians and cyclists, while maintaining appropriate traffic capacity and discouraging high speeds.

Across the capital, many similar one way road systems are being successfully transformed into community friendly, safe and well planned two way streets.

On this website you can find out about the plans, our latest news and how to contact us. If you have any questions, please use the FAQs section, or contact us via this website, to get in touch.



Objectives of the scheme

  • Provide a significant improvement to the quality of public realm on Baker Street and throughout the target area
  • Reduce the dominance of traffic throughout the target area by removing the one-way system, introducing a two-way City Street environment on Baker Street; reduce vehicle speeds and thereby improve safety; reduce vehicle trip length (and therefore noise pollution and emissions) by improving accessibility;
  • Improve the environment for pedestrians by increasing available space, improving crossings and alleviating barriers to pedestrian movement such as Marylebone Road;
  • Improve public transport accessibility by providing bus access to Baker Street for northbound services, enhancing bus stops and connectivity between bus services, coaches and underground rail;
  • Improve conditions for cyclists and provide a key cycle link between the proposed CSH11 route at Regents Park to interface with the Westminster Cycle Grid at Upper Berkeley Street and George Street;
  • Ensure adequate kerbside capacity is maintained to provide affective loading, servicing and parking for local residents and businesses;
  • Avoid any unacceptable impacts to traffic operation, in particular on Marylebone Road, Oxford Street and Marble Arch;
  • Provide a safe environment for all road users.


Baker Street Two Way

Baker Street/Park Road
Artist's impression of the new road layout from early 2019


Baker Street Two Way

Baker Street/Marylebone Road
Artist's impression of the new road layout from early 2019


Baker Street Two Way

Baker Street/Blandford Street
Artist's impression of the new road layout from early 2019


Baker Street Two Way

Baker Street/Portman Square
Artist's impression of the new road layout from early 2019

Proposed TRO Documentation

Traffic Order Cosultation related documentation - proposed


List of documents



    Drawings







Scheme Drawings

Scheme drawings A3

Back to Consultation Document »

Please select your area of interest by clicking on the below map to open the relevant drawings.

Scheme Drawings

Scheme drawings A0

Back to Consultation Documents »

Please select your area of interest by clicking on the below map to open the relevant drawings.


Baker Street Proposed Scheme North pdf 6.76 mb
Baker Street Proposed Scheme Centre pdf 4.67 mb
Baker Street Proposed Scheme South pdf 4.76 mb



 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

the
team

<span>Limited cycling provision</span>

KEY PLAYERS

Scheme Drawings

Drawings of proposed changes, including benefits and disbenefits

Back to Consultation Documents »

Please select your area of interest by clicking on the below map to open the relevant drawings.

Ivor Place - A41 Gloucester Place Ivor Place A41 Park Road junction Clarence Gate Melcombe Place, Dorset Square and Melcombe Street A501 Marylebone Road  Balcombe Street  Upper Montagu Street A501 Marylebone Road  A41 Gloucester Place junction York Street  A41 Gloucester Place junction Ivor Place - A41 Gloucester Place Ivor Place A41 Park Road junction Clarence Gate Melcombe Place, Dorset Square and Melcombe Street A501 Marylebone Road  Balcombe Street  Upper Montagu Street A501 Marylebone Road  A41 Gloucester Place junction York Street  A41 Gloucester Place junction
Parking and Loading

Parking and Loading

Back to Project Documentation »

Please select your area of interest by clicking on the below map to open the relevant drawings.

Section 1 Section 3 Section 4 Section 5 Section 6 Section 7 Section 1 Section 2 Section 3 Section 4 Section 5 Section 6 Section 7
Before and after images

Before and after images

Back to Project Documentation »


BEFORE

Baker Street Marylebone Road junction looking north EXISTING

Baker Street Marylebone Road junction looking north – existing conditions.


AFTER

Baker Street Marylebone Road junction looking north PROPOSED


Baker Street Marylebone Road junction looking north – an artist's impression of current proposals showing two way traffic, additional footway area, footway repaving and redesigned crossings. All proposals will be subject to further detailed design development.





BEFORE

Dorset Square looking south EXISTING


Dorset Square looking south – existing conditions.


AFTER

Dorset Square looking south PROPOSED


Dorset Square looking south – an artist's impression of current proposals showing two way traffic, additional footway areas, footway repaving, redesigned junction and pedestrian crossings. All proposals will be subject to further detailed design development.





BEFORE

Gloucester Place looking north EXISTING


Gloucester Place looking north – existing conditions.


AFTER

Gloucester Place looking north PROPOSED


Gloucester Place looking north – an artist's impression of current proposals showing two way traffic, new cycle lanes, redesigned junction and pedestrian crossings. All proposals will be subject to further detailed design development.





BEFORE

Marylebone Road crossing EXISTING


Marylebone Road crossing – existing conditions.


AFTER

Marylebone Road crossing PROPOSED


Marylebone Road crossing – an artist's impression of current proposals showing a wider, direct pedestrian crossing. All proposals will be subject to further detailed design development.





BEFORE

Mid Baker Street looking north EXISTING


Mid Baker Street looking north – existing conditions.


AFTER

Mid Baker Street looking north PROPOSED


Mid Baker Street looking north – an artist's impression of current proposals showing two way traffic, wider footways and opportunities for more greenery. All proposals will be subject to further detailed design development.





BEFORE

Orchard Street seen from Portman Square EXISTING


Orchard Street seen from Portman Square – existing conditions.


AFTER

Orchard Street seen from Portman Square PROPOSED


Orchard Street seen from Portman Square – an artist's impression of current proposals showing two way traffic, redesigned junction and pedestrian crossings. All proposals will be subject to further detailed design development.





BEFORE

Portman Square looking northwest EXISTING


Portman Square looking northwest – existing conditions.


AFTER

Portman Square looking northwest PROPOSED


Portman Square looking north west – an artist's impression of current proposals showing two way traffic, footway repaving, redesigned junction and pedestrian crossings. All proposals will be subject to further detailed design development.


What does the project mean for me?

Residents

The proposals seek to return Marylebone to how it was originally intended; as a place for people.

Introducing two way traffic flow would reduce the need for traffic to follow unnecessarily long routes around the road system, which should reduce journey times. It will reduce the volume of traffic having to make circuitous routes on residential streets to access and leave locations across the area, and reduce the amount of turning movements at junctions.

The project proposes to make it easier and safer for residents to cross the road by introducing new controlled crossings and improving existing crossings.

As part of the wider improvements to the area, we propose to provide wider pavements along Baker Street and at Dorset Square, reduce street clutter and improve street lighting where it is most needed. The City Council is currently exploring opportunities to introduce more trees and green spaces.

Business

Removing the existing one way system would help create a safer, more pleasant neighbourhood where people want to spend time. By making it easier for residents and visitors to access local businesses, the project aims to help businesses grow.

The project would help prepare the area for the additional visitors and workers that can be expected when Crossrail completes in 2018 and in anticipation of the planned Chiltern Line upgrade into Marylebone station.

Businesses currently based on Baker Street and Gloucester Place would feel as if they are located in a historic and prestigious location rather than on an urban motorway.

Pedestrians

The project proposes significant improvements to pedestrian amenity in the area.

The project aims to provide up to 50 signal controlled crossings in the area, many of them new, relocated or upgraded. Pedestrians would also benefit from wider crossings with shorter crossing distances and new crossings in six locations which would enable pedestrians to cross safely in any direction.

Proposed wider, less cluttered pavements along Baker Street and at Dorset Square would help reduce pedestrian congestion and the risk of petty crime. This would be accompanied by improved street lighting and better signage.

The project also aims to create better pedestrian links to the major transport hubs at Bond Street, Baker Street and Marylebone stations.

Cyclists

The project aims to improve the facilities for cyclists by providing more places to park bicycles and new cycle lanes to connect the area with the London Cycle Grid. New advanced stoplines at junctions would help make cycling in the area both easier and safer.

Motorists

The current one way road system has sections where there is little delay followed by sections that can become heavily congested.

Motorists would be able to expect a smoother journey through the area, with an area wide traffic management strategy that removes the excessive traffic queues at existing traffic hotspots. By re-introducing two way traffic flow, motorists would have more flexibility in route choice with less need to follow unnecessarily long routes around the local residential road system.

Bus users

Creating two way traffic flow on Baker Street and Gloucester Place has long been an aspiration of Transport for London in order to improve access to buses and take passengers closer to their destinations.

The project aims to make the bus network easier to understand, by locating northbound and southbound services on the same street, where possible. Bus stops could also be combined and relocated to more suitable positions.

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THE TEAM

THE TEAM

Westminster City Council

Westminster City Council is the highway authority responsible for Baker Street and Gloucester Place south of Marylebone Road. These roads form part of the Strategic Route Network (SRN). The City Council is leading on the Baker Street Two Way project.

www.westminster.gov.uk

Transport for London

Transport for London (TfL) is the local government body responsible for most aspects of the transport system in Greater London, including major roads and bus services. Its role is to implement the Mayor of London’s transport strategy and to manage transport services across the capital. TfL is the highway authority responsible for Baker Street and Gloucester Place north of Marylebone Road and Marylebone Road itself. These roads form part of the Transport for London Road Network (TLRN).

www.tfl.gov.uk

Baker Street Quarter Partnership

Baker Street Quarter Partnership is a not-for-profit organisation that was established by a core group of businesses to bring newfound purpose and focus to the Baker Street and Marylebone area. Representing over 160 organisations it aims to create a thriving and prosperous area for the entire local community. Its three core areas of work focus on creating a high quality public realm, a vibrant area and providing member services. It is already making an impact on traffic reduction through its waste and freight consolidation programmes.

www.bakerstreetq.co.uk

The Portman Estate

The Portman Estate is located between Oxford Street and Edgware Road, and extends north towards the Marylebone Road and east to Manchester Square. The Estate is a mixture of residential, retail and office space and it aims to deliver a sense of community amongst its occupiers. Over recent years, The Portman Estate has restored many Georgian buildings to today’s high standards, and has created contemporary homes and offices that reflect their historical context.

It has also improved many areas, such as Portman Square and New Quebec Street, through co-investment with the Council.

www.portmanestate.co.uk

Latest News

Latest News

NEWS - Works are moving forward

Works started on site on 24th July 2017. Phase 1 of these works will continue until December 2017.

A weekly update is sent out providing information about the on-going works and how it may affect you. please register here if you would like to receive these updates.

The images below show some of the construction taking place.

Baker Street Two Way

Excavation works at George Street with junction operating under temporary traffic lights



Baker Street Two Way

Construction mark ups at George Street junction



Baker Street Two Way

Image shows an example of the new paving



Baker Street Two Way

Works at Salisbury Place near Marylebone Road junction




NEWS - The transformation of Baker Street begins

View the Westminster City Council news article here: https://www.westminster.gov.uk/transformation-baker-street-begins-2





NEWS - Register for weekly email updates

If you would like to receive weekly emails about the works and how they may affect you, please register here





NEWS - Initial works notification letter

We will be in touch soon about how the works may affect you.

Baker Street Initial Works Notification Letter - Final

Find out more information about how your journey might be affected by visiting TFL's website – www.tfl.gov.uk/baker-street-roadworks





NEWS - Cabinet Member approval – May 2017

We have now received Cabinet Member approval to undertake implementation of the Baker Street Two Way scheme. A letter (Baker Street Initial Works Notification Letter - Final) has been sent out to all stakeholders.

Latest News

Issued Reports

Please find below links to reports presented to the Environment and Customer Services Policy and Scrutiny Committee on the 9th November 2015. This includes the Consultation report and responses to key issues.

Also below is a link to the Transport for London, Bus Consultation report.

FAQ's

Frequently Asked Questions

Travel during construction

How will my journey be affected during construction?

Baker Street and Gloucester Place will continue to operate one-way and remain open to traffic while the works continue, although temporary changes will apply, including lane closures, turning restrictions and some parking, loading and bus stop suspensions. Access for emergency vehicles throughout the works areas will be maintained at all times.

Pedestrian access to properties will be maintained at all times. Shops and businesses throughout the area will remain open. Cyclists will still be able to travel along Baker Street and Gloucester Place, however may find a more pleasant journey using local adjacent roads.

Roads in the surrounding area are expected to be busier than usual while works are in place. Please plan ahead and allow extra time for your journey. More information about when works will be taking place and where will be provided in the coming weeks and via www.tfl.gov.uk/baker-street-roadworks.

Further information

How do I find out more about what is happening on this project?

The project website www.bakerstreettwoway.co.uk will be kept up to date periodically as major elements of the scheme move forward.

If you have registered for updates, the Communications Manager will issue a weekly site update via email on Thursdays once work begins.

I have concerns about the direct impact of these works on my property, access etc – who do I get in touch with?

Please contact the Communications Manager via bakerstreet2W@wspgroup.com

Timescales

When do you plan to begin work on the scheme?

Work will start on Monday 24 July 2017 and will take approximately 18 months. The works will be handled carefully in a phased programme to keep disruption to a minimum.

When will Baker Street and Gloucester Place start working as two-way streets?

Changes to all junctions will be undertaken first followed by a switch from one-way to two-way working in early 2019. This change will be communicated widely closer to time.

Scheme partners

Who is involved in the scheme?

Westminster City Council and Transport for London are leading the project, supported by The Baker Street Quarter Partnership (BID) and The Portman Estate.

The finished scheme

What is the aim of the scheme?

The scheme aims to transform Baker Street and Gloucester Place into pleasant streets where people can get about easily and safely, relax and spend time. By reintroducing two way traffic flow along Baker Street and Gloucester Place and complementary improvements to the public realm in the area, the scheme will make the whole area more pedestrian friendly and accessible and restore the unique Marylebone character.

Why is it needed?

The evidence shows that the existing one way system along Baker Street and Gloucester Place is at the heart of many problems in the area.

The wide carriageways encourage high traffic speeds, particularly during quieter periods of the day. When traffic volumes are highest during the peak periods, there is congestion southbound on Baker Street approaching Marylebone Road and Oxford Street and northbound on Gloucester Place approaching Marylebone Road. At junctions between Marylebone Road and Portman Square, there is generally more ‘green’ signal time available for traffic on the wide approaches on the main roads, which results in spare, wasted capacity. This can lead to drivers accelerating aggressively between junctions.

There is an opportunity to redistribute road space and traffic signal time to provide greater benefit to pedestrians and cyclists, while at the same time smoothing vehicular traffic flow and discouraging high speeds. Across the capital, many similar one way road systems are being successfully transformed into community friendly, safe and well planned two way streets, for example, Shoreditch Triangle, Pall Mall and St James’s Street as part of the Piccadilly Two Way scheme and the Aldgate project currently underway.

What exactly is happening?

The dominance of traffic has been a consistent concern for those in the area for some time. The development of the project has not happened overnight. The proposals are a culmination of years’ of detailed transport studies, review of existing junctions and options appraisals which led to Westminster City Council’s Cabinet giving the green light to proceed with design and consultation.

The scheme will introduce two way flow to both Baker Street and Gloucester Place (from Oxford Street to Park Road); in other words, there will be traffic lanes operating in both directions along both streets, rather than the existing one way system.

We are also seeking to widen footways on Baker Street, install new and better pedestrian crossings and traffic controls, improve street lighting, reduce street clutter and improve cycling facilities through the area.

Will any improvements be made to Marylebone Road?

The scheme aims to improve pedestrian crossing facilities by providing ‘straight across’ crossings over Marylebone Road at the junctions with Baker Street and enhanced staggered crossing at Gloucester Place. In addition, a straight across crossing will be provided at its junction with Balcombe Street.

Benefits of the finished scheme

What are the benefits of the two way scheme?

By reducing the divisive effect of the current one way system and transforming Baker Street and Gloucester Place into pleasant streets where people can get about easily and safely, the scheme aims to improve the experience of all road users.

  • Residents will benefit from improved access and shorter, more direct journeys, as well as significant improvements to the pedestrian environment (crossing facilities, street lighting, wider footways, street lighting, removal of clutter). The proposals seek to return Marylebone to how it was originally intended; as a place for people.
  • Businesses based on Baker Street and Gloucester Place will benefit from improved access and public space which will make the area more appealing. Better bus access will make visitors and workers’ journeys easier.
  • Pedestrians will benefit from significant improvements to pedestrian amenity, including improvements to up to 50 signal controlled crossings in the area, reduced street clutter, improved street lighting and wayfinding signage, wider, less cluttered footways and improved links to the major transport hubs at Bond Street, Baker Street and Marylebone stations.
  • Cyclists will benefit from improved cycling facilities including cycle lanes, new cycle parking, advanced stop lines at junctions and improved connections to the central London cycling grid (a set of connected routes for cyclists across central London comprising a network of Quietways and Cycle Superhighway routes).
  • Bus users will benefit from a simpler bus network with northbound and southbound services on the same street where possible, and the improvements to the wider pedestrian environment.
  • Car users will benefit from smoother traffic flow through the area with more flexibility in route choice, shorter, more direct journeys and an area wide active traffic management strategy that aims to reduce excessive traffic queues at existing traffic hotspots.

Impact of the finished scheme on traffic flows

Which roads will be affected in the finished scheme?

The proposals are for two way operation along the length of Baker Street and Gloucester Place between Oxford Street and Park Road. The scheme will also require some changes to turning movements at junctions within the area. Please click here to see the existing and revised turning movements at all junctions in the area.

Will widening the pavements and reducing the number of lanes for vehicles result in more congestion?

Baker Street is wide enough, even following the widening of footways to a significant degree, to be able to provide at least three traffic lanes throughout the entire corridor, within a carriageway width of around 10m. Bus stop locations and lane arrangements (either one lane northbound and two lanes southbound, or vice versa) have been developed with the aim of minimising the potential congestion that might be caused by buses, taxis and other traffic stopping at the kerbside. Most bus stops are located where a passing lane can be provided, and if this is not possible then a wide lane has been provided to permit most vehicles to be able to pass safely when oncoming traffic permits. Bus stops in a single lane are also located where the numbers of passengers boarding or alighting the service are expected to be low, so the dwell time at the stop will be short and delays to other traffic will be minimal.

Gloucester Place is wide enough to be able to provide at least two traffic lanes throughout the entire corridor, along with 2m wide mandatory or advisory cycle lanes in each direction and parking bays within a total carriageway width of around 12m. Where a section of parking bay is to be provided, the cycle lane will run along the outside of the parking. Where bus stops are to be provided in the northbound direction, these are located where cyclists and traffic can be provided with a passing lane. Loading along the kerbside will not be permitted within mandatory cycle lanes during the hours of operation, but if a vehicle stops then there is sufficient space for other traffic to pass within the adjacent traffic lane. At junctions, where traffic might wish to wait before turning, either an additional lane is to be provided, or there will be sufficient space within the junction to accommodate waiting vehicles without causing significant delay to other traffic.

How will my street be affected by the traffic in the finished scheme?

Converting large one way systems into two way streets will result in redistribution and rebalancing of traffic around the road network. The scheme has been designed to contain current traffic within the street network around Baker Street and Gloucester Place, and there is not expected to be any significant transfer of traffic onto parallel routes.

Overall, the majority of streets will not experience any change in net traffic flow. The project improves access to local areas, and so local streets may experience an increase in one direction, yet with a corresponding decrease in the other. Please click here to see the predicted changes to traffic on each road in the area.

The need to keep the proposed scheme under review after implementation was identified through an extensive three-stage consultation and in discussions with local groups. As a result of this a monitoring strategy has been developed to monitor the traffic flow and air quality in the area, both before and after the scheme is implemented.

Impact of the finished scheme on bus services

How will existing bus services be affected in the long-term?

The project aims to make the bus network easier to understand, by locating northbound and southbound services on the same street where possible. Bus stops may also be combined and relocated to more suitable positions. Please click here to see the proposed changes to bus routes and bus stops.

Impact of the finished scheme on the environment

How will the scheme impact on congestion, air and noise pollution?

The two way road system will reduce the length of journeys, reduce traffic speeds and smooth the flow of traffic. It is expected that the scheme will not have a detrimental effect on noise and air pollution

Please click here to see the noise and air quality reports.

The need to keep the proposed scheme under review after implementation was identified through an extensive three-stage consultation and in discussions with local groups. As a result of this a monitoring strategy has been developed to monitor the traffic flow and air quality in the area, both before and after the scheme is implemented.

Impact of the finished scheme on residents, businesses and access

How will the scheme impact on emergency vehicle access?

The scheme aims to provide better access for all vehicles, by enabling shorter, more direct journeys and providing new turning opportunities which are currently not possible with the one way system.

How will the scheme impact on delivery vehicles?

The scheme aims to provide better access for all vehicles, by enabling shorter, more direct journeys and providing new turning opportunities which are currently not possible with the one way system.

Will there be any changes to the Congestion Charge Zone?

There are currently no planned changes to the congestion charge zone as part of this scheme.

How will the pedestrian crossings in the area be enhanced/improved?

The project seeks to improve up to 50 signal controlled crossings in the area. The improvements include six new crossing locations which will enable pedestrians to cross safely in any direction, 'straight across' crossings on Marylebone Road at its junction with Baker Street and Gloucester Place which will make crossing the road quicker and more convenient, additional 'green man’ crossings with 'countdown', wider crossings to accommodate more pedestrians and improve comfort, and shorter crossing distances. The scheme will also provide additional informal crossing points.

How will parking and loading be affected?

A number of changes to parking and loading arrangements are taking place as we introduce two way working throughout the scheme. As a general rule the scheme results in a net positive balance in resident and cycle parking, and no loss to the existing number of motorcycle parking and taxi ranks.

These proposed changes were consulted upon during the Traffic Management Order Consultation at the beginning of 2017. Details of these proposed changes are shown on the drawings here.

What is a mandatory cycle lane?

A mandatory cycle lane is separated from the rest of the road by a solid, continuous white line painted on the road.

The term 'mandatory' refers to motorists, not to cyclists. It means that it is compulsory that motorists keep out of a mandatory cycle lane. Motorists must not drive nor park in a mandatory cycle lane.

Other schemes

Have similar schemes been implemented elsewhere in London?

Across the capital, many similar one way road systems are being successfully transformed into community friendly, safe and well planned two way streets. One of the earliest schemes at the Shoreditch Triangle was implemented in 2002 after years of lobbying by cyclists who wanted the High Street returned to two way to reduce unnecessary journey distances, and demonstrates benefits to other road uses to this day.

In 2011, the Piccadilly Two Way scheme introduced two way traffic movements on Pall Mall and St James’s Street along with major streetscape improvements, and the Aldgate project currently underway involves removing the one way gyratory and introducing two way traffic flow along Aldgate High Street, Middlesex Street and St Botolph Street in order to provide a significant public space.

Approval has recently been granted to introduce two way traffic flow on Tottenham Court Road, Gower Street and Bloomsbury Street, along with complimentary public realm improvements.

Additional Questions

What is the impact of the scheme on road safety?

Similar schemes have been introduced across London in recent years, at Shoreditch Triangle, Piccadilly/ St James’s and South Kensington, and these provide evidence that the severity of accidents can reduce following conversion from one way to two way streets. In Shoreditch, for example, use of formal crossings has increased significantly and informal crossing away from assigned crossing areas has decreased, and cyclists no longer have to weave across multiple lanes or use the inconvenient one way system to reach their destination, and so overall accident risks have been substantially reduced. Studies from the US have demonstrated reductions in the number of collisions following conversion from one way to two way streets. Although intersections of two way streets have more conflicting movements, one way streets correlate with decreased levels of driver attention and also allow higher travel speeds because linked signal timings result in less frequent stops for vehicles. Pedestrians also prefer crossing two way streets because drivers tend to travel more slowly and vehicular conflicts are more predictable.

An analysis of accidents across the study area has been carried out to understand current issues and determine how the scheme could improve road safety. It is considered that accident numbers and/or severity will reduce as a consequence of:

  • Reduced vehicle speeds, arising from narrower streets and removal of the multilane approaches;
  • Improved and increased availability of formal pedestrian crossings, with shorter crossing distances;
  • Improved cycle facilities, advanced cycle stoplines, banned vehicle turns where conflicts with cyclists might be high and greater driver awareness of cyclists due to cycle lanes;
  • Greater driver awareness due to the legibility of two way operation and conventional junction layout, fewer weaving movements along the streets and the increase in conflicting movements at junctions;
  • Minimal opposed right turn issues, due to junction design and greater accessibility and opportunity to achieve access by avoiding right-turns.

How will the changes be monitored?

Throughout the construction and implementation of the scheme, and for at least a 6 month period following opening, there will be regular and, in some cases, continuous monitoring of conditions across the area to ensure that:

  • The scheme is delivered with minimal disruption to residents, businesses and visitors to the area;
  • The scheme operates broadly as expected and, where it might not;
  • Mitigation measures are identified and implemented.

This will be achieved through regular liaison with amenity and resident groups, and key stakeholders, and a variety of dynamic and CCTV monitoring, traffic surveys and other data gathering.

Over the next couple of years, there are likely to be changes to traffic patterns across the roads of central London, as a consequence of the building and implementation of other major transport infrastructure initiatives, such as the Oxford Street Development, and the West End Project (Tottenham Court Road Two Way). Because of this, it will be essential to gather traffic data that accounts for these changes, so that any impacts of the BS2W project can be assessed independently. To account for as many changes leading up to the start of BS2W works as possible, new data gathering will be carried out just before the works start, and then again at a suitable moment after the scheme is opened, following an appropriate settling-in period. The monitoring strategy will comprise the following:

  • Continuous dynamic traffic management using CCTV and the TfL Urban Traffic Control ‘SCOOT’ system, to ensure that traffic congestion is avoided as far as possible;
  • Vehicle traffic flow and journey time surveys on streets and at junctions across the network, particularly on streets where residents have expressed concern over potential “rat-running”;
  • Cyclist and pedestrian flow and journey time surveys along streets and at junctions across the area;
  • Pedestrian environment review (PERS);
  • Vehicle speed surveys;
  • Bus performance and bus patronage, boarding and alighting surveys;
  • Road Safety Audits;
  • Accident data analysis (continuous, for at least 3 years to establish impact of scheme);
  • Crime and petty theft;
  • Parking and loading behaviour.

What is the impact of changes on Harewood Avenue/ Marylebone Road junction as part of the Cycle Quietway route?

There is not expected to be any significant impact of the changes to Harewood Avenue on the Baker Street Two Way scheme. This scheme is not expected to result in any noticeable change in traffic demand on Harewood Avenue at the Marylebone Road junction, and the introduction of one way southbound and a northbound contra-flow cycle lane on Harewood Avenue is not expected to affect materially the traffic patterns on Baker Street and Gloucester Place.

What is the impact of the finished scheme on journey times, especially bus journey times?

Throughout all periods of the day, bus journey times are predicted to generally either stay the same or reduce in the southbound direction. This is because southbound buses stay on Baker Street, where traffic flows are likely to be lower than existing. Southbound bus journey times are predicted to reduce from around 12-14 mins to 10-12mins.

In the northbound direction, buses on Gloucester Place (Routes 30 & 74) are not expected to experience increases, and could see reductions in journey time. Northbound buses transferred to Baker Street (Routes 2, 13, 82, 113, 139, 189, 274) are expected to experience slightly longer journey times because they have slightly further to travel and will now pass through junctions that have pedestrian crossing stages.

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What happens Next

KEY FEATURES AND ASSOCIATED BENEFITS

  • Introducing two way traffic flow would reduce the need for traffic to follow unnecessarily long routes around the road system, which should reduce journey times. It will reduce the volume of traffic having to make circuitous routes on residential streets to access and leave locations across the area, and reduce the amount of turning movements at junctions.
  • Improved facilities for cyclists by providing more places to park bicycles and new cycle lanes on Gloucester Place to connect the area with the London Cycle Grid. New advanced stop lines at junctions would help make cycling in the area both easier and safer.
  • Proposed wider, less cluttered pavements along Baker Street and at Dorset Square South and Melcombe Street would help reduce pedestrian congestion and the risk of petty crime. This would be accompanied by improved street lighting and better signage.
  • Provision of up to 50 signal controlled crossings in the area, many of them new, relocated or upgraded. Pedestrians would also benefit from wider crossings with shorter crossing distances and new crossings in six locations which would enable pedestrians to cross safely in any direction. In addition, it is proposed to improve pedestrian crossing facilities on Marylebone Road at its junction with Baker Street and Gloucester Place and Balcombe Street. This will help to improve pedestrian amenity and safety and reduce crossing time.
  • Bus network will be easier to understand, by locating northbound and southbound services on the same street, where possible. Bus stops could also be combined and relocated to more suitable positions.
  • Carriageway, footway and street lighting improvements will also be undertaken as part of this proposed scheme.

     

What happens Next

Consultation Documents


First round of consultation May - July 2015



Bus user consultation June-September 2015




Second round of consultation February – March 2016



Revised and updated project documents for second round of consultation




TMO Consultation November 2016 – January 2017






TMO map 01 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

01 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

Cabinet Member Reports

1. Cabinet Member Report – Baker Street Two Way - Feasibility Study


2. Cabinet Member Report – Baker Street Two Way - Initial design


3. Cabinet Member Report – Baker Street Two Way – Petition


4. Cabinet Member Report – Baker Street Two Way – Detailed design


5. Cabinet Member Report – Baker Street Two Way – Implementation